looking-at-the-universe:

Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex

looking-at-the-universe:

Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex

IC5070 - The Pelican Nebula by Jesús M. Vargas and Maritxu Poyal

"New reprocessed. This time the sum total of Narrow Band + RGB + Luminance Halfa shots, treated with stars."

The Pelican Nebula is an H II region associated with the North America Nebula in the constellation Cygnus. The gaseous contortions of this emission nebula bear a resemblance to a pelican, giving rise to its name. [**]

(via 8-dreamy-8)

astronomicalwonders:

The Coyote Head Nebula
When searching for the nicest nebulae in the sky it’s nice when your friends help you out. This striking star formation region, mapped in infrared light by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, was recently spotted by one of Spitzer’s Twitter followers searching through the GLIMPSE360 panorama of our Milky Way galaxy.
One of multitudes of star-forming nebulas scattered across the sky, this area had been a bit of a “dirty” secret, tucked away behind a veil of dust that blocks our view in visible light. That obscuring veil fades away under Spitzer’s infrared gaze revealing a collection of young stars bursting out of the dusty gas clouds in which they formed. Astronomers identify this area only by a collection of catalog numbers like IRAS 15541-5349.
Credit: NASA/Spitzer

astronomicalwonders:

The Coyote Head Nebula

When searching for the nicest nebulae in the sky it’s nice when your friends help you out. This striking star formation region, mapped in infrared light by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope, was recently spotted by one of Spitzer’s Twitter followers searching through the GLIMPSE360 panorama of our Milky Way galaxy.

One of multitudes of star-forming nebulas scattered across the sky, this area had been a bit of a “dirty” secret, tucked away behind a veil of dust that blocks our view in visible light. That obscuring veil fades away under Spitzer’s infrared gaze revealing a collection of young stars bursting out of the dusty gas clouds in which they formed. Astronomers identify this area only by a collection of catalog numbers like IRAS 15541-5349.

Credit: NASA/Spitzer

(via megacosms)

phiife:

this eases the entire fuck out of my mind.

(via strawberryleather)

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Tarantula Nebula by pbkwee

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Tarantula Nebula by pbkwee

(via megacosms)

aerienette:

Lose your mind. Find your soul. on We Heart It.
。.⋆:*☽~Goddess Bless~☾*:⋆.。

aerienette:

Lose your mind. Find your soul. on We Heart It.

。.⋆:*☽~Goddess Bless~☾*:⋆.。

(via etherealmeditation)

astronomicalwonders:

Supernova Remnant N 63A Menagerie
A violent and chaotic-looking mass of gas and dust is seen in this Hubble Space Telescope image of a nearby supernova remnant. Denoted N 63A, the object is the remains of a massive star that exploded, spewing its gaseous layers out into an already turbulent region.
The supernova remnant is a member of N 63, a star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Visible from the southern hemisphere, the LMC is an irregular galaxy lying 160,000 light-years from our own Milky Way galaxy. The LMC provides excellent examples of active star formation and supernova remnants to be studied with Hubble.
Many of the stars in the immediate vicinity of N 63A are extremely massive. It is estimated that the progenitor of the supernova that produced the remnant seen here was about 50 times more massive than our own Sun. Such a massive star has strong stellar winds that can clear away its ambient medium, forming a wind-blown bubble. The supernova that formed N 63A is thought to have exploded inside the central cavity of such a wind-blown bubble, which was itself embedded in a clumpy portion of the LMC’s interstellar medium.
Credit: NASA/Hubble

astronomicalwonders:

Supernova Remnant N 63A Menagerie

A violent and chaotic-looking mass of gas and dust is seen in this Hubble Space Telescope image of a nearby supernova remnant. Denoted N 63A, the object is the remains of a massive star that exploded, spewing its gaseous layers out into an already turbulent region.

The supernova remnant is a member of N 63, a star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Visible from the southern hemisphere, the LMC is an irregular galaxy lying 160,000 light-years from our own Milky Way galaxy. The LMC provides excellent examples of active star formation and supernova remnants to be studied with Hubble.

Many of the stars in the immediate vicinity of N 63A are extremely massive. It is estimated that the progenitor of the supernova that produced the remnant seen here was about 50 times more massive than our own Sun. Such a massive star has strong stellar winds that can clear away its ambient medium, forming a wind-blown bubble. The supernova that formed N 63A is thought to have exploded inside the central cavity of such a wind-blown bubble, which was itself embedded in a clumpy portion of the LMC’s interstellar medium.

Credit: NASA/Hubble

(via megacosms)